THE RUSSIAN RIVER: ALL RIVERS Screenings

To All,

Don McEnhill, Executive Director of Russian Riverkeeper is a featured interview in:

THE RUSSIAN RIVER: ALL RIVERS –
THE VALUE OF AN AMERICAN WATERSHED

“The time of using greed to justify degrading our environment is over.”

“We need to get very honest with the amount of water we have in the worst year. We tend to plant vineyards and put up houses based on the wet years, but we need to be planning for the dry years.”
– Don McEnhill

The non-profit documentary features Don McEnhill and other voices on the subject of the protection of the Russian River watershed.

NOW WE NEED YOUR HELP!
This film needs wider distribution and could really use your help!  Please visit our IndieGoGo fundraising website. Even a small donation will help further distribute this film. We’d love it if you would forward this email to a friend or two! Our sincere thanks!

Here is where you can see this film…and with your help we hope to add more venues!

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2014 at 1:00 P.M.
The Clover Theater
Cloverdale, CA 95425

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2014 at 7:00 p.m.
Raven Film Center
Healdsburg, CA 95448

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2014 6:30pm
West Coast Salmon Summit
The Mill Casino and Hotel – Hwy 101 on Coos Bay
North Bend, Oregon

MONDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2014 at 7 p.m.
Rialto Cinemas
Sebastopol, CA 95472

Thank you! If you have questions please write us at producer@russianriverallrivers.com

Many thanks from all of us,
Producers at The Russian River: All Rivers LLC

THE RUSSIAN RIVER: ALL RIVERS – THE VALUE OF AN AMERICAN WATERSHED is a fiscally sponsored project of the International Documentary Association (IDA), 501©(3) nonprofit arts organization.  Contributions in behalf of THE RUSSIAN RIVER: ALL RIVERS – THE VALUE OF AN AMERICAN WATERSHED are payable to IDA and are tax deductible as allowed by law.

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Posted in Agriculture Impacting Water, Groundwater Impacts, Lakes and Resevoirs Impacts, Logging Impacting watershed, Pesticide pollution, Pharmaceutical Contamination, Salmonid/Wildlife Impacts, Streams and Wetlands Impacts, Vineyards, Waste Discharge Pollution, Water Conservation Issue, Watershed Related Concerns | Leave a comment

Eel River goes to ground near Fortuna

BY GLENDA ANDERSON
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT
September 14, 2014

The main stem of the Eel River snakes northwesterly some 200 miles through canyons, forests and verdant farmland, gathering water from its many tributaries as it travels from its headwaters in the Mendocino National Forest to its terminus at the Pacific Ocean south of Humboldt Bay.

But this year, just 10 miles short of its final destination, the river vanishes from view as it passes by the small city of Fortuna, a sign that three years of drought is affecting traditionally water-rich Humboldt County, where the average annual rainfall of 55 inches is more than twice the state’s average.

Other factors, including sediment deposits in the river and escalating water diversions by marijuana cultivators have contributed to the rare, disappearing Eel River incident, according to state and federal fisheries authorities.

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New Screenings! THE RUSSIAN RIVER: ALL RIVERS – THE VALUE OF AN AMERICAN WATERSHED

Photo of the Russian River with Kayak

This non-profit feature-length documentary explores the diverse forces influencing the health of California’s Russian River watershed.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2014 at 1:00 P.M.
The Clover Theater
121 E 1st St
Cloverdale, CA 95425
(707) 894-6347
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Hearing Dates for Sonoma County’s Riparian Protection Hearings

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!!

Please plan to attend one or more of the hearings on riparian protection.  In times of drought our waterways and surrounding lands are particularly vulnerable to degradation, and terribly important as potential areas for recharging our groundwater and protecting our streams.

Mark your calendar & spread the word:

Board of Supervisors hearing
Oct. 21, 2014 (tentative)
Nov. 18, 2014 (tentative)
Supervisors’ Chambers
Sonoma County Administration Building
575 Administration Drive, Room 102A

Be sure to let others know about these important hearings.  Our voices will be needed to inform and encourage good decisions.

have a great week,
Rue

Posted in Salmonid/Wildlife Impacts, Streams and Wetlands Impacts, Watershed Related Concerns | Leave a comment

Environmental Water Caucus Shreds ‘Misleading’ Bay Delta Conservation Plan

Written By: Dan Bacher, June 12, 2014

The Environmental Water Caucus, a diverse coalition including conservation, fishing and environmental justice groups and the Karuk and Winnemem Wintu Tribes, on June 11 responded to Governor Jerry Brown’s Bay Delta Conservation Plan and its associated Environmental Impact Report with a stinging 250-page critique of BDCP’s inadequacies and multiple failures to conform to state and federal laws.

“The plan is an omelet of distortion and half-truth intended to mislead and deceive,” said Bill Jennings, Executive Director of the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance (CSPA).

Barbara Barrigan-Parrilla, Executive Director of Restore the Delta (RTD), characterizes the BDCP as “a construction project masquerading as a habitat conservation plan.”

The core of the plan is the construction of two underground twin tunnels 35 miles long and 40 feet in diameter to deliver Sacramento River to corporate agribusiness interests on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley, Southern California water agencies and oil companies conducting fracking and steam injection operations in Kern County.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 11, 2014 BDCP – A MISLEADING PLAN FOR CALIFORNIA

The Environmental Water Caucus has responded to the Bay Delta Conservation Plan and its associated Environmental Impact Report with a stinging 250-page critique of BDCP’s inadequacies and multiple failures to conform to state and federal laws. Among the criticisms detailed in the Caucus’ review are that it is contrary to the Delta Reform Act of 2009, it fails to provide adequate ecological assurances under state and federal endangered species laws, it fails to assure funding for the project, and it fails to analyze reasonable alternatives to the preferred plan for huge tunnels under the Delta. Other points highlighted by the Caucus include:

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How to Support Riparian Protection for Sonoma County’s Waters

MARK YOUR CALENDAR!!

Please plan to attend one or more of the hearings on riparian protection.  In times of drought our waterways and surrounding lands are particularly vulnerable to degradation, and terribly important as potential areas for recharging our groundwater and protecting our streams.

This is a very important condition to not only protect water quality in our waters of the state but also flow which is becoming more and more critical during the continuing drought.

Mark your calendar & spread the word:

Board of Supervisors hearing
Oct. 21, 2014 (tentative)
Nov. 18, 2014 (tentative)
Supervisors’ Chambers
Sonoma County Administration Building
575 Administration Drive, Room 102A

Be sure to let others know about these important hearings.  Our voices will be needed to inform and encourage good decisions.

have a great week,
Rue

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Comment on Dam Questions on CA’s Drought

This reporter doesn’t seem to understand that reservoirs lose water through evaporation, particularly when they get low (and thus warmer).  Other problems include methane production, due to decaying vegetation that is always being supplied by the streams flowing into them and by contributions from the reservoir margins.  They trap nutrients that otherwise would support coastal ecosystems. Unless managed to avoid such effects, they hinder the flushing of downstream river reaches, so that sediment buildup may bury gravelly pools and prevent fish spawning.

Jane

Posted in Climate Change Impacts, Environmental Impacts, Groundwater Impacts, Lakes and Resevoirs Impacts, Water Conservation Issue | Comments Off

Some Dam Questions about the California Drought

By Robert Green

Diamond Valley Lake

For Southern Californians, the current record-breaking drought means letting the lawn fade to a trendy golden brown and making sure the hose doesn’t water the asphalt while you’re washing your car. It does not mean wondering whether anything will come out of the faucet and, unlike in the drought of 1977, it hasn’t stopped most restaurants from automatically serving water to their customers. The drought is not a constant presence here. Los Angeles residents are generally environmentally oriented, but they’re feeling the drought less than they otherwise might, in large part because the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California invested ratepayer money in the 1990s building and filling reservoirs. And that’s the model for the future, right? You build the dams and fill them in the wet years to hold water for use in the dry ones. It’s like the three little pigs and their houses, one of straw, one of sticks and one of brick. L.A. is the third little pig. No big, bad wolf is going to blow down our house; or rather, no big, bad drought is going to dry up our water supply. We planned ahead. We spent. We built. We’re ready.

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Posted in Agriculture Impacting Water, Environmental Impacts, Lakes and Resevoirs Impacts, Streams and Wetlands Impacts, Water Conservation Issue | Comments Off

Water Zoning Rules Backed

Sonoma County planners approve ordinance on agriculture, development on waterways

By ANGELA HART
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

Sonoma County planning commissioners Thursday night signed off on a new ordinance spelling out a wide set of regulations that limit agriculture and development along 3,200 miles of streams and rivers.

The controversial changes, decades in the making, would create buffer zones around waterways and protect sensitive plant and animal habitat on roughly 82,000 acres of unincorporated parts of the county. Thursday’s 4-1 vote followed eight hours of sometimes heated deliberation, and sends the regulation to the Board of Supervisors, who are expected to vote on the zoning rules sometime this fall.

More than 70 people packed a county meeting room Thursday, while roughly a dozen others spilled out into the hallway to fill out speaking cards and read opposition letters. Speakers, many of whom were farmers and ranchers, said they were concerned about changes affecting grazing operations, habitat protection areas that extend past the riparian corridor to include tree lines and rules guiding underground wells.

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